Forced and Precarious Labor in the Global Economy: Slavery by Another Name?

Online Course

edX
Forced and Precarious Labor in the Global Economy: Slavery by Another Name?

What is the course about?

Forced and Precarious Labor in the Global Economy: Slavery by Another Name?
The course Forced and Precarious Labor in the Global Economy: Slavery by Another Name? is an online class provided by Wits University through edX. The skill level of the course is Introductory. It may be possible to receive a verified certification or use the course to prepare for a degree.
Much of the global economy runs on forced and precarious labor. This course explains how this economic engine operates, and how worker and migrant rights can be strengthened.
Course description
Led by some of the world’s leading authorities in the field, this course provides an introduction to the role of forced and precarious labor in the global economy. Building upon content from the widely acclaimed online platform ‘Beyond Trafficking and Slavery,’ it explores how vulnerable workers – whose conditions are frequently compared to slavery – routinely endure precarious pay and conditions in order to generate goods and services further up the economic chain. The course will explore how various kinds of exploitation have been classified – as modern slavery, human trafficking, or forced labor – and consider some of the effects of using the language of slavery to describe the abuses that are happening today.The primary focus of the course will be migrants and workers. Students will learn how patterns of exploitation are linked to economic and political interests. They will be invited to consider the strengths and limitations of different models of intervention and protection. Drawing upon examples from across the world, the course will specifically focus on labor in three major categories of work: supply chain work, migrant work, and sex work. Students will be asked to consider how these categories’ connections to global economic and political forces create patterns of vulnerable, precarious, and forced labor. The course will also consider the limitations of popular approaches focusing upon the politics of rescue, and instead consider alternatives based upon models of worker rights, collective organizing, and decent work. This course should appeal to anyone interested in both better understanding and effectively challenging global patterns of exploitation, vulnerability, and abuse.

Prerequisites & Facts

Forced and Precarious Labor in the Global Economy: Slavery by Another Name?

Course Topic

Humanities, Social Sciences

University, College, Institution

Wits University

Course Skill Level

Introductory

Course Language

English

Place of class

Online, self-paced (see curriculum for more information)

Degree

Certificate

Degree & Cost

Forced and Precarious Labor in the Global Economy: Slavery by Another Name?

To obtain a verified certificate from edX / Wits University you have to finish this course or the latest version of it, if there is a new edition. The class may be free of charge, but there could be some cost to receive a verified certificate (49.00 USD) or to access the learning materials. The specifics of the course may have been changed, please consult the provider to get the latest quotes and news.
Wits University
Forced and Precarious Labor in the Global Economy: Slavery by Another Name?
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School: Wits University
Topic: Humanities, Social Sciences
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